Broadway Musical Recommendations Tailored Just for YOU

Broadway Musicals 2015

Wondering what show you should see tonight (or next week)? Here’s Shari on the Aisle’s guide to help you decide which Broadway musical(s) to see right now, based on your personal preferences. Read the “YOU” descriptions below, choose the one that best represents you, then go see a show!

Keep in mind: this list is far from exhaustive. With the Broadway Spring season well under way, there are abundant choices for both the occasional and frequent theatregoer. The following suggestions are culled from some of the newest shows. You should also consider productions that have been around for a while—those oldies but goodies like “Matilda,” “A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder,” “Aladdin,” and “Kinky Boots.” (Also keep in mind that Shari on the Aisle hasn’t yet seen all of the new shows, including “Finding Neverland” and “An American in Paris.”

(Stay tuned: I will provide personalized play recommendations in my next post).

YOU: “I want to see a show that has me whistling a happy tune when I leave the theatre.”
GO SEE: Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “The King and I” (Lincoln Center Theatre at the Vivian Beaumont). Nobody does musicals better than Rodgers & Hammerstein—or Lincoln Center Theatre. Under the sure direction of Bartlett Sher, LCT knows how to put on a classy, glossy, top notch show. While “The King and I” isn’t on a par with say, Rodgers & Hammerstein’s “South Pacific” (Lincoln Center presented that show, also directed by Mr. Sher and also starring the ebullient Kelli O’Hara, a few years ago and it was sheer perfection), you’ll happily hum along with “I Whistle a Happy Tune,” “Getting to Know You,” and “Shall We Dance.” This production is big and gorgeous. Sure, the book is a bit weak and Ken Watanabe’s accent renders some of the dialogue and lyrics indecipherable. But Ms. O’Hara’s glorious voice and radiant presence, along with the sumptuous costumes and stunning sets, more than make up for these shortcomings. And yes, you will leave the theatre whistling a happy tune and with a song in your heart.

King and I

YOU: I’d rather see a dark, thought-provoking show than a cute piece of fluff. (And I’d make a mad dash to see anything starring the legendary Chita Rivera).
GO SEE: “The Visit” (Lyceum Theatre). A musical that explores the darkness of men’s souls? Yes, and it’s terrific. “The Visit” is a work created by theatre royalty. It’s the last collaboration of John Kander and Fred Ebb, the musical geniuses behind “Cabaret,” “Kiss of the Spider Woman,” and many other award-winning shows. The book is by Theater Hall of Famer Terrence McNally. And Chita? She’s a national treasure. The plot centers on Claire Zachanassian, the richest woman in the world, and her return to the small town where she spent a miserable childhood. The town has fallen on hard times, and the villagers who once taunted and reviled her believe she has come back to save them. Claire offers to do just that, but with a chilling twist. At 90 minutes with no intermission, “The Visit” is riveting, intelligent theatre. Some of the songs are reminiscent of “Cabaret,” but there’s nothing wrong with that. And Chita’s haunting performance of “Love and Love Alone,” sung while performing a pas de deux with her younger self (Michelle Veintimilla) is well worth the price of admission. You won’t leave this show humming a happy tune, but rather with the satisfying feeling of having experienced brilliance live on stage.
Watch a video from the show.

YOU: “I want to see something that will tickle my funny bone—the sillier the better.”
GO SEE: “Something Rotten” (St. James Theatre, in previews; opening April 22). Did you love “The Book of Mormon” and “Spamalot?” This original new show, directed and choreographed by Casey Nicholaw (“Book of Mormon”) stars Brian d’Arcy James (“Next to Normal,” “Shrek the Musical”) and Christian Borle (Tony-award winner, “Peter and the Starcatcher,” TV’s “Smash”) as rival playwrights Nick Bottom and William Shakespeare. Shakespeare is the 1590’s equivalent of a rock star, and Nick and his younger brother Nigel are desperate to come up with a strategy to compete. They turn to soothsayer Nostradamus (a show-stopping Brad Oscar) who encourages them to create the very first musical: “Oohs, aahs, big applause, and a standing ovation. The future is bright, if you can just write a musical!” The first three musical numbers in the show—“Welcome to the Renaissance,” “God, I Hate Shakespeare,” and “A Musical”—are absolutely hysterical, brilliant crowd pleasers. While nothing in Act 2 equals the perfection of those first few songs—and the preview performance I saw went on a bit too long—this show is tons of fun and will be a huge hit. So go back in time around 400 years or so to the Renaissance, “Where everything is new.” You’re guaranteed to have a great time.
Watch a video from the show.

YOU: “I want to see an old-fashioned, beautiful, romantic show.” OR: “I have a tweenage daughter who geeks out over “High School Musical.’”
GO SEE: “Gigi” (Neil Simon Theatre). You’re probably familiar with the Oscar-winning1958 film version of “Gigi” starring Leslie Caron, Maurice Chevalier, and Louis Jordan. This “re-launched” (according to the Playbill) Broadway version stars Vanessa Hudgens, the talented young star of Disney’s “High School Musical” films, along with an excellent cast of Broadway veterans (Tony-award winner Victoria Clark, Tony nominees Dee Hoty and Howard McGillin). The new “Gigi” has been sanitized to make it more “G-rated” than the film. For example, the famous song “Thank Heaven for Little Girls,” sung by the Chevalier’s aging roué character in the film, is now sung by two women, Gigi’s grandmother and her aunt. And the fact that 15-year-old Gigi (now 18 in the Broadway musical) is being groomed to be a courtesan is never discussed. So no worries, parents: you can feel at ease taking your impressionable tweens and teens to this charming show. Musical highlights include the exuberant Act 1 closing number, “The Night They Invented Champagne” and the tender title song, wistfully sung by Corey Cott, the former “Newsies” star. The costumes and sets are lovely and Hudgens, who has been a performer since the age of 8, is delightful. At the preview performance I attended, teenage girls in the audience repeatedly shrieked with joy (and not just over Hudgens). Adults who like their musicals squeaky clean and romantic will also enjoy this 2-1/2 hour escape to a somewhat mythical La Belle Epoque, where Ms. Hudgens sparkles like the bubbles in a glass of champagne.

Gigi

For ticket information, see the shows’ websites as listed above, or visit:
Playbill.com

TDF Discount Theatre Booths

Broadway Helper

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BROADWAY SPRING PREVIEW: Plays

Heidi Chronicles

Baby, it’s cold outside! But here’s a happy thought to warm a theatre lover’s heart: Milder weather and the new Spring Broadway season are only a few weeks away, with some shows beginning previews in February.

Here are a few plays that are coming up soon. (Keep in mind that dates are subject to change). As usual, there will be a mix of new works and revivals, musicals and plays, both serious and comic. (Stay tuned for my Broadway Spring Preview Part II: Musicals—coming up in my next post).

Fish in the Dark First Preview: February 2; Opening: March 5

Theatre: Cort, 138 W. 48th St.

Attention, “Seinfeld” and “Curb Your Enthusiasm” fans: Larry David has written a play. The television star will make his Broadway debut—as an actor and writer—When David returns to the stage “for the first time since eighth grade” (according to the show’s Website).

In Fish in the Dark David plays Norman Drexel, a character he describes as, “very similar to Larry David—it might even be Larry David with a different name.” The story was inspired by the death of a friend’s father. David told David Letterman recently that he never intended to play the role himself: “I imagined anyone but me as the star. I’m not an actor.” (Although one imagines playing himself won’t be too much of a stretch).

David will take the stage supported by a cast of theatre veterans, including Rita Wilson, Rosie Perez, Lewis J. Stadlen, and Jayne Houdeyshell (a wonderful Tony-nominated stage actress who is a personal favorite of mine). Anna D. Shapiro (This Is Our Youth, Of Mice and Men, August, Osage County) directs.

Will Larry David become a big fish on Broadway? With advance ticket sales of over $11 million so far, it’s looking “pretty, pretty good.”

The Heidi Chronicles First Preview: February 23; Opening: March 19

Theatre: Music Box, 239 W. 45th St.

The original production of Wendy Wasserstein’s landmark 1988 play won the dramatic Triple Crown: the Tony, the Pulitzer Prize, and the New York Drama Critics Circle award for Best Play. The 2015 revival has a promising cast: Elisabeth Moss (HBO’s “Mad Men”) stars as Heidi, along with Bryce Pinkham (Tony nominee for A Gentlemen’s Guide to Love and Murder) and Jason Biggs (“American Pie” films, “Orange is the New Black”), along with another of my favorite New York actresses, Tracee Chimo (Bad Jews, Harvey, “Orange is the New Black”). Pam McKinnon (Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, A Delicate Balance) will direct.

The play explores “big” subjects: feminism, work, love, and motherhood, viewed via 20 years in the life of art historian Heidi Holland, from the 1960s through the 1980s, from her high school days through her career and desire for a child.

The Heidi Chronicles is an important American play, with themes that are as relevant today as they were 27 years ago. Hopefully the revival’s popular young actors will attract a new generation of theatre goers who will continue the conversation Wasserstein began in 1988. (Wasserstein’s other notable plays include Uncommon Women and Others, The Sisters Rosensweig, and Isn’t it Romantic. She died in 2006 at age 55).

Skylight First Preview: March 16; Opening: April 2

Theatre: Golden, 252 W. 45th St.

There is already lots of pre-Broadway transfer buzz around this new production of Skylight, thanks to its recent acclaimed, sold-out run in London’s West End. The drama, a 1995 work by British playwright/screenwriter David Hare (Plenty, The Vertical Hour), stars British actors Carey Mulligan (best known for her work in the films “An Education,” “Drive,” “The Great Gatsby,” and “Inside Llewyn Davis”) and Bill Nighy (“Love, Actually,” “The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel”). Interestingly, Nighy reprises the role he played in a 1997 London production of Skylight.

Skylight is a relationship piece that explores issues of class and capitalism that is, some say, based on events in the life of British designer/retailer Terence Conran. Mulligan and Nighy play former lovers Kyra (a schoolteacher in a tough school) and Tom (a wealthy businessman), who are separated by large gaps in social class, age, and world view. The entire play takes place in Kyra’s run-down flat when Tom pays a visit. The two have not seen each other in several years (since Tom’s wife found out about their affair). Two-time Tony award winner Stephen Daldry (Billy Elliot) directs.

Note: Ms. Mulligan’s character cooks up a pot of spaghetti on stage. So, word to the wise: if you’re in the first few rows, don’t go to the theatre hungry!

The show is scheduled for a 13-week run.

Also coming up, more Brits on Broadway:

The Audience. Helen Mirren stars (once again) as Queen Elizabeth II in a new play by Peter Morgan. Billed as “Sixty years, 12 Prime Ministers, one Queen,” the play imagines the dialogue between the Queen and her Prime Ministers in their private weekly meetings, throughout the 60 years of her reign.

First Preview: February 14; Opening: March 8; Schoenfeld Theatre

Wolf Hall Parts I and II. Direct from a hit run in London, these two plays are based on Hilary Mantel’s popular novels Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, tales of intrigue in the court of Henry VIII. They will be performed in repertory, with a limited run.

First Preview: March 20; Opening: April 9; Winter Garden Theatre